Welcome Cecelia Campochiaro

We got to chat with the wonderful Cecelia Campochiaro, the designer behind our September projects, the Corrugated Shawl and the Parallelogram Scarf.  She’s also the creator and author of Sequence Knitting: Simple Methods for Creating Complex Reversible Fabrics, a brilliant book that “introduces a radical and simple approach for creating amazing fabrics by working a sequence of stitches over and over again.”  We first met Cecelia while she was touring and teaching with her book and we’re now so pleased to host her here on our blog…

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How did you start knitting? Have there been any particularly inspiring instructors along the way?

I learned to knit as a child, but didn’t really knit in earnest until around the year 2000. The most inspiring knitting instruction was surely Elizabeth Zimmerman and her books, especially Knitting Without Tears. It has been a privilege to work with Meg, Cully, Michelle at Schoolhouse Press, who distribute Sequence Knitting. I also took a workshop from Catherine Lowe in the early 2000s which was an amazing time of ahas and learning about what knitting really means.

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How did your interest in Sequence Knitting begin, and how has it evolved?

When I was traveling a lot for work and wanted easy knitting, I made Stephanie Pearl-McPhee’s One Row Handspun Scarf. It’s a 1-row pattern that repeats a simple sequence of stitches, but the fabric was surprising and beautiful. After that I just started experimenting to see what would happen…

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We know your day job is in the tech industry, please tell us about your work and how it might have influenced your love of Sequence Knitting?  

I worked most of my career on microscopes used to inspect computer chips. It was really interesting and involved many different aspects of engineering and science, including the use of algorithms to both control the microscopes and also to interpret the results. I almost called Sequence Knitting “algorithmic knitting” because an algorithm is just a rule, and sequence knitting is about following a rule to make a fabric.

When you’re not working and knitting, what are some of your other passions/hobbies?

Travel, food, photography – there are so many joys to pursue.

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Your Instagram account is filled with some amazing travel photographs, is there any place that has inspired you and your knitting?  

I’m not sure if a place has inspired me, but some people I have met on my travel have inspired me a lot. Two notables are Britt-Marie Christoffersson and her incredible geometric fabrics, Marianne Isager and how she uses inspirations randing from African textiles to manhole covers…

What are some of your favorite knitting tools that fill your notions bag?

I really like having sets of the same needles so I can optimize my gauge without changing anything else about the needle except its size. Interchangeable sets are nice, but just having a complete set of 24-inch non-interchangeables is really nice.

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What’s currently on your needles and what have been some of your most enjoyable projects?

I’m making a scarf with a beautiful breed-specific yarn from Daughter of a Shepherd. I like projects that play with color or have strong graphic qualities. Colormill is the first pattern I published and I still love that piece and the memory of making it.

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Are there any hints about what might lie ahead for you? Perhaps a new book in the works?

I retired from high tech at the end of May and I am focused on the next book, which is all about making marls. It has that element of color play, and I hope I have more to say this coming winter.

Wonderful!  Thanks for being a guest on our blog, Cecelia!  Follow along with her at her website, SequenceKnitting.com.

P.S. Just for fun…

This or That Cecelia(1)

 

 

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